What is a URL?

It's the text in the bar at the top of your browser.

Every web page, image or resource of any kind on the Internet has a URL.

It's like a postal address - it's the unique location of something on the Internet.

How do I visit the URL?

The most popular way is just clicking a link in a web page.

Every time you tap or click a link, you visit a new URL.

You can also type it into the address bar.

What's in a URL?

URL structure

1. Scheme or protocol

If a URL is a postal address, the scheme is your mode of transport.

  Type Behaviour
http Web page Make a request to show the page
https Secure web page Make a request to show the page
ftp File transfer Login to the FTP server to download the file
mailto Email Open up your email client
file Local file Load the file from your local machine

2. Host or domain

Which domain the request is for.

If a URL is a postal address, the domain is the town. They split the internet up into general areas.

Usually a single web server handles a single domain.

3. Path

If a URL is a postal address, the path is the street and house number.

It's the specific area of the domain that we want to go to.

4. Query

If a URL is a postal address, the query is you ringing on the doorbell and asking a question.

Many times, a query string isn't needed. You just visit a URL and it'll show you a page.

But sometimes you need to ask the web page a question and it gives you back an answer.

Searching Google is a great example: the query string contains the question you're asking.